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Written by Norman Clark
Published: 05 July 2021
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One of the most important lessons of the pandemic has been the vital importance of maintaining frequent personal contact with clients.

Client Relations Management (CRM) systems need to move from the marketing department onto the desktop of every fee earner in a law firm. In the hands of a reasonably diligent lawyer -- even a horribly busy one -- a good desktop CRM system streamlines the flow of information between a central marketing and business development database and each lawyer. These systems have demonstrated quite convincingly how they can save valuable time, build more durable and productive one-to-one relationships with clients and their organizations, and produce a substantial return on a firm's total investment of resources, time (especially partner time), and management attention.

Since I spoke on the topic of Artificial Intelligence and Relationship Management several weeks ago at a global forum of the Swiss-Chinese Law Association, I have received inquiries from conference delegates, as well as from a few of our firm's own law firm clients, asking about what they should require in a desktop CRM system. Here are six things that I suggest that you consider in selecting a CRM system for your fee earners (and yes, I believe that all fee earners, regardless of status in the firm, should use a desktop CRM system).

Because our firm does not accept any commission, finder's fee, or referral fee for our recommendations of technology products, this blog post is not the proper place to provide one for a desktop CRM system.  However, if you would like my personal recommendation of the CRM system that I use, and whether it would be suitable for your firm, please contact me by e-mail.

One final point: Regardless of the system that you select for your firm's fee earners, there still remains the ongoing management challenge of motivating -- and, sadly, in some cases, requiring -- your colleagues to use it. Our firm can help you with that issue, too.

Norman Clark